One-To-One Time

After the lockdown had been eased in the UK in early July, (The 4th I think: Independence Day) the people who I help to support were finally ‘Let of the leash’ so to speak. They had been locked in for months because they had been collectively labelled “Extremely vulnerable and highly susceptible to contracting the dreaded virus”. So when the green light was given, all the staff worked collaboratively and independently to take them out of their ‘Prison’ and get them back out into society. I was asked if I was willing to take one of the more ‘Challenging’ guys out a couple of days a week. This particular chap has a multitude of learning disabilities and can be very unpredictable in a funny-ish way.

I knew that it would be potentially dangerous for him to come into direct contact with other people (He cannot understand the wearing of the mask concept and violently refuses to wear it) The only option was to drive into the countryside (Which is quite challenging because he is constantly kicking my elbow, especially when I’m trying to change gear) and find a park to push him around in his wheelchair.

It was a task in itself to keep my eyes on his trainers because I quickly discovered that he doesn’t like to wear them. On one occasion I took him for a leisurely push around a lake in the country only to realise that he had kicked his trainers off without me noticing! So I had to backtrack for about half a mile and scan the tree lined puddled path until I spotted them. After that first occasion, I bought him some long thick socks and didn’t bother putting trainers or shoes on his feet! I also discovered I could possibly have been a goalkeeper or a cricketer because everytime he had finished his cup of tea he would throw his cup, one of which was lost because it ended up floating in a duck pond!

The photograph below captures the back of his head (Obviously for anonymity reasons) but this one is very recent. (I think he enjoys getting out and about but I can’t really say if he does) The photographs below the first one are from another occasion that deserve a whole blog to itself, which will eventually follow this one.

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73 thoughts on “One-To-One Time

  1. That’s a very noble act you’re performing. I suspect your curmudgeon appreciates the open air time and your humanity, too lacking in recent years everywhere. He’s a bit, I think, like the man Dylan Thomas wrote about; he’s ‘raging at the dying (of his) light awkwardly, wryly while he still can make a fist. The last stanza of the poem reads: “you, …there on that sad height, curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears. Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light.”

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    1. I guess you could be right and that’s a very interesting way of looking at his situation. The chap in question can’t talk, but he makes several noises that cannot be understood. But he has a huge, fun loving character. Maybe you’re right Jo, maybe he is raging against what fate has given him. Thank you for reading and commenting β™₯️

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  2. I would feel very peaceful if I was there being taken on that walk. He must have too. Sans sneakers, of course, hehe. But free feet are so much better anyway……… πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

    Liked by 5 people

      1. I know you had to go looking for them, though. At least you found them!
        Glad to know you’re staying well, in the meantime, too.
        Trying not to lose my mind here. We’re watching the election, which is way too close at the moment. It’s baffling!

        Liked by 4 people

    1. Thanks Kev. Yea, it’s difficult to understand how they feel or if they understand what’s going on with the lockdown. But they paced the house and became extremely manic at times.
      They relaxed a little bit after lockdown had ended but now it’s back it will effect them.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Many years back, I had a similar position, working with the developmentally disabled. This post recalled to me the many adventurous outings we took our “clients” on. I recall one amazing trip the shopping mall where one of our folks, a kid who loved to jump in water, kept leaping into the indoor decorative fountain.

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  4. I’m sure that he does enjoy going out and about with you as I’m sure if he didn’t he would have kicked off his shoes before getting in the car! He probably felt at home enough with you to kick them off while he was out 😊

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Many years ago I volunteered with the Down’s Syndrome Association in Scotland. Trying to help one lady get into a swimsuit in a tiny changing room at the baths had me laughing and crying. She put both legs in one leg hole…still she had a fabulous time.

        Liked by 3 people

      1. Yes, the place is indeed a beautiful one..!πŸ₯°
        You have the privilege of visiting this wonderful beauty of nature whenever you need to thenπŸ™‚

        It was my great pleasure reading this piece.🧑
        Have a great day.

        Liked by 2 people

      2. Yes, I can go whenever I get the chance. It’s just one of a multitude of places I can drive to in the area where I live. Thank you again for reading and commenting Akshita, I truly appreciate it πŸ˜ŠπŸ‘β™₯️

        Liked by 2 people

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